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1 February 2017

Working practices of female interventional cardiologists

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Summary

Working practices of female interventional cardiologists

Dear Colleague

On behalf of the EAPCI Women’s Committee, we request BCIS members to kindly complete this survey.

Previous surveys suggest that both women and men consider that the burden of workload and the overall risk linked to radiation exposure hamper women from a career in interventional cardiology. Frequently, the “risk of a pregnancy” associated to young female cardiologists discourage catheterisation laboratories directors to choose them for a fellowship and above all for a permanent position. Moreover laws about radiation exposure, and maximum allowed doses could vary from one country to another. Likewise, regulations for professionally exposed workers also vary between countries.

The following are the aims of this survey:

1. To determine gender ratio of medical/paramedical personals working in catheterisation laboratories.

2. To evaluate the proportion of coronary/peripheral/structural and EP procedures performed in European catheterisation laboratories.

3. To evaluate radiation exposure, protection, means of measurement and educational program proposed and/or required as well as the level of awareness about radiation protection.

4. To determine the real-life practice for pregnant catheter lab staff.

Many thanks for your time in completing this survey.

Dr Vijay Kunadian
Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Interventional Cardiologist
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University and Freeman Hospital

Summary

Working practices of female interventional cardiologists

Dear Colleague

On behalf of the EAPCI Women’s Committee, we request BCIS members to kindly complete this survey.

Previous surveys suggest that both women and men consider that the burden of workload and the overall risk linked to radiation exposure hamper women from a career in interventional cardiology. Frequently, the “risk of a pregnancy” associated to young female cardiologists discourage catheterisation laboratories directors to choose them for a fellowship and above all for a permanent position. Moreover laws about radiation exposure, and maximum allowed doses could vary from one country to another. Likewise, regulations for professionally exposed workers also vary between countries.

The following are the aims of this survey:

1. To determine gender ratio of medical/paramedical personals working in catheterisation laboratories.

2. To evaluate the proportion of coronary/peripheral/structural and EP procedures performed in European catheterisation laboratories.

3. To evaluate radiation exposure, protection, means of measurement and educational program proposed and/or required as well as the level of awareness about radiation protection.

4. To determine the real-life practice for pregnant catheter lab staff.

Many thanks for your time in completing this survey.

Dr Vijay Kunadian
Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Interventional Cardiologist
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University and Freeman Hospital

Take the survey here

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We would be very grateful if you could please take a moment to compete this survey- many thanks and much appreciated!