Announcement of the Winner of the BCIS Young Investigator Award Competition

Announcement of the Winner of the BCIS Young Investigator Award Competition

18th December 2023

BCIS Young Investigator Award competition is a unique opportunity for our young colleagues to submit their original research. This year we received large number of applications for the above award than previous years. Initial independent selection process shortlisted the top 5 candidates who were invited to present their research in person at the BCIS Research Day held at the Royal College of Physicians London on 14/12/23. The selection panel on the day had the difficult task to choose one winner.

I am delighted to confirm that this year’s winner is Dr. Aish Sinha from King’s College London. Aish’s research is based on angina/ischaemia with non-obstructive coronary arteries (ANOCA/INOCA). His work further enhanced our understanding of this under diagnosed condition and improved treatment for patients with coronary microvascular dysfunction. Aish will present his research again at the ACI Conference in London next month.

Many congratulations to Aish for this fantastic achievement!

I also would like to take the opportunity to congratulate all the finalists for their outstanding work. I personally (echoed by the attendees on the BCIS Research day) found our young colleagues’ work very inspiring and thrilled to see we have so many talented young colleagues who really are our future leaders and investigators.

Professor Vijay Kunadian

Research lead BCIS

 

 

BCIS Council Member: Winner of Election

BCIS Council Member: Winner of Election

6th December 2023

Dear BCIS Member,

Following the recent election, BCIS Council is pleased to welcome Dr Ash Kotecha as the new Member without portfolio who will be taking over from Dr Shrilla Banerjee in January.

There was an outstanding field of applicants for this post, and on behalf of Council, we would like to congratulate Dr Kotecha and thank all the candidates for their interest and to everyone who voted.

Best Wishes,

Gerald Clesham, BCIS Hon Secretary
David Hildick-Smith, BCIS President

BCIS AHP Working GRoup: New Members

BCIS AHP Working GRoup: New Members

10th November 2023

BCIS Allied Health Professionals New Appointments

Following the recent application process, it is my great pleasure to be able to announce two new members who will start their three year tenure in January 2024.

Having reviewed all the applications, the panel of judges whittled it down to the following candidates:

  • Kerry Pena
  • Christine Gill

Many congratulations! It is an exciting time to be working in education for AHPs in Interventional Cardiology and I am very much looking forward to working with you in the near future.

BCIS would like to congratulate the successful candidates and thank all those who applied for their continued interest in BCIS. The Working Groups form the backbone of the society, and BCIS was delighted to have so many high calibre applicants.

Best Wishes,

Sarah Carson

Allied Health Professional Working Group Lead

BHVS Annual Meeting: 10 Free Places Offered to Interventional Trainees

BHVS Annual Meeting: 10 Free Places Offered to Interventional Trainees

8th September 2023

The British Heart Valve Society (BHVS) is offering 10 free places for interventional trainees with an interest in structural and valve intervention at its Annual Meeting in October. The 10 free places are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

The theme for the one-day meeting taking place on Friday 13 October at the Royal College of Physicians, London, is State-of-the-Art Management in Heart Valve Disease.

Session titles include:

  • SCTS: State-of-the-Art in Heart Valve Surgery
  • BISMICS: State-of-the-Art in Minimally Invasive Heart Valve Surgery
  • State-of-the-Art in Transcatheter Heart Valve Intervention
  • How Do We Achieve State-of-the-Art?
  • Best Abstract Awards
  • BHVS AGM

Click here to view the full programme and speaker line-up.

So, if you’re an interventional trainee with an interest in structural and valve intervention and would like a free place at the BHVS Annual Meeting, please email Richard Bazneh (admin@bhvs.org.uk) to express your interest.

BCIS Council Member: Winner of Election

BCIS Council Member: Winner of Election

8th August 2023

Dear BCIS Member,

Following the recent election, BCIS Council is pleased to welcome Dr Vinoda Sharma as the new Member without portfolio.

There was an outstanding field of applicants for this post, and on behalf of Council, we would like to congratulate Vinoda and thank all the candidates for their interest and to everyone who voted.

Best Wishes,

Gerald Clesham, BCIS Hon Secretary
David Hildick-Smith, BCIS President

AHP Working Group NAME ANNOUNCEMENT

AHP Working Group NAME ANNOUNCEMENT

7th August 2023

Dear BCIS AHP member,

Following a review of a potential change of name to the Allied Health Professional’s Working Group, I would like to thank everyone who took part in the online survey and the additional survey at the Summer meeting. I am pleased to announce the the name of the group will remain as the AHP Working Group.

Best Wishes,

Sarah Carson

AHP Working Group Lead

My First AHP Summer Meeting Experience

My First AHP Summer Meeting Experience

1st August 2023

BCIS AHP Annual Conference — Bournemouth, 26-27 June 2023

Words by Hayley Hill, Nurse Angiographer at University Hospitals Northamptonshire NHS Group

I was surprised and excited when I was invited to join the BCIS Allied Healthcare Professionals Working Group, yet instantly imposter syndrome slowly crept in as dates started appearing in my diary. I need not have worried. On meeting the rest of the team, I realised that though I was surrounded by a group of experts with vast experience, I was essentially surrounded by a group of like-minded individuals whom I felt like I had worked with for years!

The Royal Bournemouth Hotel played its debut in being the venue for the AHP summer meeting, and despite the hot weather, and clearly never having experienced a vast quantity of NHS workers at a buffet, nothing seemed too much effort for them to address. The AHP Working Group had put a lot of thought into the flow of the day, and the use of the different spaces available to accommodate both the lecture and practical elements available. Regardless of whether the teaching was hands-on or more theoretical, the energy to encourage interactive sessions was infectiously positive, and the days whipped by without acknowledging the volume of information inhaled.

After doing a joint talk in the Fundamentals stream on day one, I managed to relax into the role a bit more and attempted to play to my strengths and tried to aid the Millbrook team. Whilst they seemed to make it look effortless in transitioning different groups to different spaces, my attempts came across like a flappy chicken herding cats, so I was in total awe of their unflappable stature.

To sum it all up; alongside this being a resource rich conference with multiple modalities, and both clinical and industry experts at the attendee’s disposal, I personally enjoyed the ethos and culture of sharing experiences and knowledge, and having time to meet AHPs from across the nation. In so many ways this gave me confidence in knowing my own centre was in line with others, in terms of safety and evidence, and re-fuelled my passion for everything cath lab, with ideas to adopt to improve both my team and patient experience.

BCIS Trainees Virtual Meeting 2022 — Call for Case Submissions

BCIS Trainees Virtual Meeting 2022 — Call for Case Submissions

24th November 2022

Call to all interventional trainees!

It is often said that we learn the most from our complications. Do you have a complication that taught you an important lesson, and are you willing to share this with other trainees? If the answer to this is yes, and you would value the opportunity to present at a national virtual meeting of your peers then look no further. We are currently looking for cases for presentation at the BCIS Coronary Interventional Trainees e-course, to be held on Monday 12th December 2022.

The case does not have to be something unusual, unique or spectacular, but it does have to be a case you were directly involved in and with a learning outcome you can share with others. All cases should follow the same format. This is a very interactive session so you should consider asking the audience for their input on the case at various points, i.e. “what would you do next/now?” A brief summary of the clinical background to the patient including indication for the proposed procedure.

The case then needs to be presented with appropriate angiographic images to demonstrate the procedure. It is important for you to get across your decision making process in how the complication was manged, and various options considered/discussed. The case need to conclude with what done in this specific case, and the outcome, with a summary of what the take home messages were from your personal perspective and how it would change your practice in the future.

All submissions should be submitted via the form below by the closing date of 5pm on Monday 5th December, 2022. The Training and Education Group (TEG) will then select the best cases for presentation at the meeting.

 

Open to BCIS Trainee members only.

BCIS Secretariat, Millbrook Medical Conferences Ltd
Unit 8, Midland Court, Central Park, Lutterworth
Leicestershire LE17 4PN

BCIS: How it got off the ground, By Man Fai Shu, first president of BCIS

BCIS: How it got off the ground, By Man Fai Shu, first president of BCIS

20th April 2022

Background to the start of BCIS

Following Andrea Gruntzig’s seminal Lancet paper on Transluminal Angioplasty of Coronary Arteries in 1978 the take up of the practice in the UK was slow and haphazard compared with Europe and USA.  It is hard to imagine now, but in the early 80’s opinions remained divided among cardiologists, including some experts in diagnostic angiography. Unsurprisingly cardiac surgeons were particularly cynical about the safety and effectiveness of the new technique.  Any interested cardiologist has to overcome numerous barriers, including raising funding for the expensive equipment, getting hands on training on the technique and management of complications, and last but not least to convince non-participating colleagues to refer cases for consideration.

Doing PTCA in the early years means coping with bulky, non steerable balloon systems, non digital imaging chains with no instant review (that came in the late 80’s with VHS tape systems replacing 35mm cine films). For years only single vessel disease was deemed suitable and even so success rate was below 80% due to the occurrence of acute occlusions often leading to emergency surgical bailout.  Surgical standby was mandatory and often lack of a free ITU bed means cancelling a whole list.

For most aspiring operators the main hurdle was funding. The large London centres had better access to ad-hoc funds, and a handful of key operators made a tentative start but were reluctant to share their early experiences.  The lack of any open registry of number of procedures and success rates impeded any progress on increasing the adoption of the practice and UK.

Outside London the only active centre was in Sheffield where David Cumberland, an interventional Radiologist who knew Gruntzig personally, gathered a handful of cardiologists from Yorkshire and the Midlands and held weekly meetings.  The group called itself the British Coronary Angioplasty Group with Cumberland as its chairman. The meeting venue was the Royal Victoria Hotel, chosen for its proximity to the Sheffield train station. I joined the group in 1982 when we would meet and present angiograms to discuss case discussion, feasibility for angioplasty and shared our experiences of successes and complications.

Meanwhile Edgar Sowton then President of BCS and already performing regular PTCA started the BCS working party on PTCA and invited me to write a report on the state of angioplasty practice (or lack of) in the UK (see box on timelines). I presented findings at the plenary sessions in the BCS meeting in Manchester and it generated a heated debate given the prevailing views on the new, unproven, expensive and hazardous procedure. The event helped to trigger a growing consensus that something had to be done to counter the negative image of PTCA.

David Cumberland felt that it was time for a change and he and about two dozen cardiologist met in Sheffield. New interim officers were appointed to start the process of forming a new society with the declared purpose of promoting coronary interventions through a process of regular meetings to discuss advances in the technique and equipment, sharing experiences of complications and their management. Schemes were drawn up for training programs and a national registry of coronary interventions. British Cardiovascular Interventional Society was born.

Impact of BCIS in cardiac services in the UK

Despite the humble beginnings BCIS has obviously fulfilled the goals it set up to achieve. A somewhat surprising additional benefit was the levelling up of the regional and sub reginal centres without which the UK would have taken many more years to catch up on the delivery of what is clearly one of the most significant advances in medicine.  More so than many other specialist societies the incorporation of BCIS and other sub-specialist societies under one umbrella of BCS greatly increased participation form consultants and trainees, and associated healthcare professionals.

COVID Cardiovascular Research Roundup

COVID Cardiovascular Research Roundup

24th April 2020

Dear BCIS Colleague,

Prof Divaka Perera & his colleagues have produced a very neat summary of the most recent literature about COVID and the heart. It covers myocardial injury, ACEI/ARB, STEMI outcomes amongst other things.

Click the download button at the bottom of the page to view.

I hope that you find it interesting and helpful?

Very best wishes,

Nick Curzen, BCIS President