Clinical Case

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5 December 2016

Magnetic Resonance Late Gadolinium Enhancement Detects Acute Aortic Intramural Haematoma

Case Prepared by: Tarique Hussain

An 81-year-old male patient presented with sudden and intense chest pain.

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Summary

An 81-year-old male patient presented with sudden and intense chest pain. On the emergency ward, a transthoracic echocardiogram was performed showing an enlarged and wall-thickened thoracic aorta. Computed tomography angiography confirmed the enlarged and wall-thickened thoracic aorta. In non-contrast images, a high-attenuation crescentic thickening of the aortic wall suggested an intramural hematoma or aortitis (Figure 1). 18F-FDG-PET suggested that there was no overt inflammation but findings were equivocal (Figure 1). The patient was stable without pericardial effusion, periaortic hematoma, or large aortic aneurysm; therefore, a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study was performed in the next 12 hours to rule out aortitis (1).

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Summary

An 81-year-old male patient presented with sudden and intense chest pain. On the emergency ward, a transthoracic echocardiogram was performed showing an enlarged and wall-thickened thoracic aorta. Computed tomography angiography confirmed the enlarged and wall-thickened thoracic aorta. In non-contrast images, a high-attenuation crescentic thickening of the aortic wall suggested an intramural hematoma or aortitis (Figure 1). 18F-FDG-PET suggested that there was no overt inflammation but findings were equivocal (Figure 1). The patient was stable without pericardial effusion, periaortic hematoma, or large aortic aneurysm; therefore, a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study was performed in the next 12 hours to rule out aortitis (1).

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